Tuesday, October 4, 2016

The Story of Weaving

No matter how many times I visit Sadu House, I never tire of seeing what's on display.
The story of weaving takes you from the desert, where women traditionally wove household and decorative items.

To the days of urbanization when men took on the role of weaving cloth for the traditional cloak known as a bisht.
There's a video to be watched about the history of Sadu weaving.
But for me, more than anything, I just like looking around, taking it all in.
Once a traditional Kuwaiti home, the Sadu House is now a cultural center preserving the ethnic handicrafts of the Bedouin people.
We sleep but the loom of life never stops and the pattern which was weaving when the sun went down is weaving when it comes up.
Henry Ward Beecher

Have a terrific Tuesday!

21 comments:

Hindustanka said...

It is so great Tammy that you are involved in the culture of Arabic region. Very interesting to read about weaving tradition which actually existed and exists in India too )))
Lovely quote...

SusanLotus said...

Thank you for sharing a bit history.

I remember when I was 9 years old and went
to Tunis for three weeks. It was such an
adventure for me. Several years later,
I dreamed of going on a desert safari.
When you are just a little girl everything
seem so exciting... :)

At least I did ride a camel.
Have a great day!

Little Treasures said...

Weaving - it's been something I have been working off and on for some time!I would have loved visiting the house and learning the weaving story!

Quinn said...

I could spend a LOT of time in Sadu House! Thank you for these intriguing photographs, Tammy. I especially love the one with the bobbins - such lovely tones.
On my first trip to the American SW, I sketched (no camera way back then!) a Navajo loom in a museum, with the idea of trying to make something similar someday. That day hasn't come...yet. But just Saturday at the fiber fair I was smooshing some raw Churro fleece and imagining!

Linda said...

Interesting!

Jennifer Hays said...

Oh, wow, that is so interesting. It's hard to imagine wearing a cloak like that in the heat of the desert, but maybe it would keep you cooler and would be great to have at night when the temperature falls. I love textiles and enjoy watching weaving demonstrations but have never tried it. Someday I'd really like to give it a try. Thanks for sharing about Sadu House, Tammy.

kathyinozarks said...

Loved this post thanks Tammy

Diane said...

Very informational and interesting. The basket of different colored skeins is beautiful. I love the colors in it. Diane

Betsy said...

These are beautiful photographs Tammy. I've always wanted to learn to weave, but have never really understood the concept. Your photos are very haunting to me for some reason. Maybe it's the simplicity and beauty. Thank you for sharing them with us.
Blessings,
Betsy

Mereknits said...

Fascinating post today Tammy, makes me want to get out my loom and get busy.
Meredith

Teresa Kasner said...

I'm so glad to see a museum honoring the necessary tasks of those people over the ages. I mean.. it looks as if they had to weave their own homes while traveling over the desert on camels! Amazing! ((hugs)), Teresa :-)

Karen said...

Beautiful photos. It amazes me to think of all the time that goes into weaving these beautiful fabrics. We take cloth and fabric for granted.

Draffin Bears said...

Hi Tammy,

Very interesting post and I enjoyed reading about and seeing your photos. The art of weaving is fascinating and the wonderful work and creations and how each piece turns out.
Have a great week
Hugs
Carolyn

Lisa said...

What a fascinating place to visit. Seeing the process of the weaving make me very much appreciate the labor of the finished product.

Caterina Giglio said...

Amazing tour of both museums, your home and the fabric museum.. incredible... xo

Place Under The Pine said...

What a neat museum...this is my first time here on your blog, but, I think I'm going to be back. You have some interesting stories.

Mariette VandenMunckhof-Vedder said...

Dearest Tammy,
Oh, I'm with you and would love to see every bit of this ancient weaving style in the Sadu tradition.
One can only admire those women how they created beautiful things with so little to work from.
Sending you hugs,
Mariette

Createology said...

This Sadu home is an amazing resource of learning and honoring the traditions of life past and present. I am very grateful that you share this with us because I don't think I will ever get to see it in person. Blessings Dear...

Linda P said...

The concept of producing a fabric from start to finish done by different cultures is fascinating to me and the weaving part is so well illustrated in the displays in the Sadu House. You get a feel of the lengthy process necessary to make the clothes and items in Bedouin homes in beautiful, but restrained shades that reflect the environment in which the people live. The accessories are equally lovely. Wonderful photos of the displays and architecture of the building, as always. Thank you for sharing.

~*~Patty S said...

Brilliant quote to accompany your wonderful photos Tammy!
Fascinating peek into some of the "threads" of Bedouin life.
Thank you for sharing oxo

Oliva Ohlson said...

Great post and so informative! Wonderful pictures and I wish I could visit this place. I think it's simply an amazing art!

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